You are here

What's New at UIC SPH?

UIC SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH GETS $1.4 MILLION GIFT

$1.4 million gift from the estate of Dr. Paul Levy and his wife, Virginia F. TomasekThe University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health has received a $1.4 million gift from the estate of Dr. Paul Levy and his wife, Virginia F. Tomasek. Levy was a founding member of the school and the first and longest-serving director of its division of epidemiology and biostatistics, a position he held for 15 years.

A highly innovative biostatistician whose expertise was widely sought by biomedical and public health researchers around the world, Levy, through his work, improved the lives of millions.

The gift, the largest to the school from an individual, will support the first endowed professorship in the division – the Paul Levy and Virginia F. Tomasek Professorship. It will also serve as an enduring source of student scholarships.

To read more, click here.

FACULTY, ALUMNI IN FIGHT AGAINST EBOLA OUTBREAK

Several UIC faculty and alumni areProfile image of Nelli engaged in the battle against the Ebola outbreak.

Nelli Westercamp, who earned a Ph.D. in epidemiology last year, is in Uganda. Her husband and fellow UIC Ph.D., Matthew, went to Liberia Oct. 13.

Nelli Westercamp is an epidemic intelligence service officer with the malaria branch at the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. “I worked on Ebola response as part of the International Infection Control team at the Emergency Operations Center in Atlanta in August and September, before coming to Uganda,” she wrote in an email.

To read more, click here.

RESEARCHER OFFERS OPPORTUNITY TO ‘FACE YOUR AGE’ FOR SCIENCE

 Do you look your age?JayOlshansky150x164, SPH, What is new about SPH

A new website co-developed by UIC researcher S. Jay Olshansky tells users how old their face looks, relative to other people their age.

“If people tell you that you look young for your age, you probably do, since their eyes are doing what the program does — just less efficiently,” said Olshansky, professor of epidemiology in the School of Public Health.

“Our program will quantify what your friends are telling you.”

To read more, click here.

‌FORMER DEAN DR. JACOB BRODY, NATIONAL FIGURE IN PUBLIC HEALTH, 1931-2014

Jacob A. Brody, SPh, About SPH, What's newDr. Jacob A. Brody, professor emeritus and former dean of the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago, died April 22 in Chicago. He was 82.‌

Brody was a physician, researcher, epidemiologist and administrator for the U.S. Public Health Service and the National Institutes of Health. His government service included a year in Hiroshima as research coordinator for the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission.

To read more, click here.

 

UIC SPH STUDENTS HELP HAITI ON THE LONG ROAD BACK FROM EARTHQUAKE

 

Although Haiti received an outpouringDr. Janet Lin in Haiti image of international assistance immediately after a powerful earthquake struck the Caribbean island nation in January 2010, the impoverished country remains afflicted by a lack of adequate health care worsened by the country’s severely underdeveloped infrastructure.

Since the spring of 2011, teams of UI Health professionals and University of Illinois of Chicago School of Public Health students have been traveling to Haiti to provide both immediate medical care and to identify possible long-term improvements to the country’s health system. The first two teams traveled to Haiti during spring breaks in 2011 and 2012, and a third is planned for spring of 2013.

To read more, click here.

 

 

UIC SPH’S RADICAL PUBLIC HEALTH HOSTS EVENT TO DISCUSS HEALTH REFORM

Many are aware that Cuba has Man speaking out on the podium at the event.comparable health outcomes to the United States and outperforms the U.S. in infant mortality rates according to some measures. However, few people know how a developing country that spends a fraction of the U.S.’s per-person costs on healthcare can achieve these outcomes. Radical Public Health (RPH), a group formed last summer in the School of Public Health (SPH) invited Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences (EOHS) professor Dr. Peter Orris to speak about the Cuban health care system with Steve Brouwer, a writer and journalist who has been writing about the Cuban-inspired health reforms in Venezuela. Together they brought a wealth of information about the Cuban system and how the Cuban model has been put to work in remote villages in Venezuela.

To learn more, click here.

MHA PROGRAM RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS CAHME ACCREDITATION

The Master of HealthcareMen having a discussion Administration (MHA) program at the UIC School of Public Health is now accredited through the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education, (CAHME).  CAHME accreditation is an important benchmark for students and employers alike that ensures the integrity of healthcare management education. This exciting commendation now makes the UIC MHA Program accredited by both CAHME and the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH).

To read more, click here.

INTERVENTIONS TO MEDICAID PATIENTS WHO NEED HELP THE MOST

While our health care system undergoesProfile pic of Lindsey Leininger rapid changes in these fiscally challenging times, health care providers and federal and state agencies are tasked with seemingly conflicting challenges: improving the quality of patient care while constraining or reducing costs.

To read more, click here.

 

 

 

KIDS CONSUME MORE SODA AND CALORIES WHEN EATING OUT

Children and adolescents consume Profile pic of Powell Lisa.more calories and soda and have poorer nutrient-intake on days they eat at either fast-food or full-service restaurants, as compared to days they eat meals at -- or from -- home.

A new study, by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and published online by Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, is the first to look separately at fast-food and full-service restaurants. The researchers examined calorie intake, diet quality, and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, particularly soda, on days when youngsters ate out as compared to days they did not. They used data from the three waves of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the years between 2003 and 2008, which included 4,717 children ages 2 to 11 and 4,699 adolescents ages 12 to 19.

To learn more, click here.

WHITE CONSTRUCTION WORKERS GET HIGHER WORKERS' COMP

White non-Hispanic construction workers Profile pic of L. Friedmanare awarded higher workers' compensation settlements in Illinois than Hispanic or black construction workers with similar injuries and disabilities, according to researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health.                  

The disparity amounted to approximately $6,000 more for white non-Hispanic claimants compared to minority workers in the same industry, says Lee Friedman, assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences at UIC and lead author of the study, which was published in the October issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

To read more, click here.

STRONG STUDY SKILLS LINKED TO LOWER RISK FOR VIOLENCE

Sixth-grade students with strong Profile Pic of HenryDavid study skills tended to be less violent two years later than those with weak study skills, even if other factors in their lives put them at risk for violent behavior, a study by a University of Illinois at Chicago researcher and colleagues shows.

The research team examined factors in the lives of middle-school students that increased or decreased the risk of violence. The research identifies factors at the start of sixth grade that predict higher or lower levels of violent behavior by the spring of eighth grade. Strong study skills predicted lower levels of violence, a significant protective effect.

To read more, click here.

cure-violence

FROM CEASEFIRE TO CUREVIOLENCE: NEW BRAND REFLECTS PROMISE, OPTIMISM

After 12 years of reducing shootings and killings in Chicago, Baltimore, New York City, and cities across the globe as CeaseFire, the anti-violence project of the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health is becoming CureViolence, effective September 13, 2012.

To learn more about the Cure Violence program, click here.

HOSPITAL CEO MOVES TO PUBLIC HEALTH

After 12 years as the CEO ofJ DeNardo the University of Illinois Hospital,  John DeNardo moved to the UIC School of Public Health to become the program director of the Master of Healthcare Administration Program.

“The last 12 years have been among the most professionally rewarding of my life. I have also been fortunate to participate in teaching the next generation of health care leaders as adjunct faculty in both the College of Pharmacy and the School of Public Health,” wrote DeNardo in a farewell blog post to UI Hospital employees.

Before joining the University of Illinois Hospital in 2000, DeNardo was a pharmacist, pharmacy administrator and a top administrator at three Veterans Administration hospitals in the Chicago area.

To read more, click here.

UNDERSTANDING HUMAN BEHAVIOR

It’s a challenge to tease out theHedeker Donald relationships between behavioral influences. Take smoking, for example. Smokers often say they smoke to steady their mood. Until a few years ago, however, researchers could not verify whether this stabilization actually occurred because their statistical methods could not model variances. Methods existed for measuring averages in mood — whether someone felt generally happy or generally sad — but not its vacillation.

That is, a method to trace mood volatility did not exist until a University of Illinois at Chicago researcher developed a statistical method to address this question in a longitudinal study of smoking patterns among adolescents. That researcher, Donald Hedeker, professor of biostatistics in the UIC School of Public Health, recently developed software that will allow data analysts and social scientists to use his methodology. 

 To read more, click here.

ENGAGING OLDER ADULTS IN THEIR TRANSITIONAL CARE

Dr. Susan Altfeld, clinical assistant Altfeld Susanprofessor  of Community Health Sciences in the School of Public Health, organized a community-based forum for older adults in collaboration with the Illinois Transitional Care Consortium (ITCC).  The Consumer Voices Forum, which was funded by the University of Illinois Institute for Policy and Civic Engagement, took place at Plymouth Place Retirement Community in suburban La Grange Park.  It brought together several community-based organizations and Chicago institutions with the purpose of facilitating dialogue on relevant community issues facing older adults.  ITCC’s Chicago area community partners, Aging Care Connections and Solutions for Care, participated along with Rush University Medical Center’s Health and Aging Department and the Health and Medicine Policy Research Group.  

To read more, click here.

FIT AND STRONG! RECEIVES $3 MILLION GRANT

The University of Illinois at Chicago hasHughes Susan been awarded a $3 million grant to study the effectiveness of two community-based health promotion programs for older adults with osteoarthritis.

The research is funded by the National Institute on Aging.

The study will compare Fit and Strong!, an evidence-based physical activity and health behavior change program, with Fit and Strong! Plus, the traditional program with an added weight management/dietary component.

To read more, click here.

MORE EDUCATION, SOCIOECONOMIC BENEFITS EQUALS LONGER LIFE

olshansky

Despite advances in health care and increases in life expectancy overall, Americans with less than a high school  education have life expectancies similar to adults in the 1950s and 1960s.

 "The most highly educated white men live about 14 years longer than the least educated black men," says S. Jay Olshansky, professor of epidemiology at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health and lead author of the study. "The least educated black women live about 10 years less than the most educated white women."

To read more, click here.

PROVIDING YOUTH WITH HANDS-ON PUBLIC HEALTH EXPERIENCE

“Look!  What’s that in the water?” asked

SPH Kid holding a test tube

Xavier Luellen, a 7th grader who was among 76 students exploring the Chicago River as a participant in the UIC School of Public Health summer public health science institute.  Luellen and his peers pulled on their hip boots, grabbed nets and viewing trays, and went into the water to find out.  This hands-on approach is part of the UIC SPH’s 6-week program that provides 6th-12th graders interested in a health profession with a summer enrichment program focused on public health science and research.

To learn more, click here.

THE MAJOR MEDICAL BREAKTHROUGH

UIC SPH Professor of Epidemiology S. Jay Olshansky partnered with Allianz Global Investors to create a public health video that discusses the most important medical breakthrough in modern history.  The 4-minute video asks if anesthesia, antibiotics or vaccinations were the medical breakthrough of the last century.  Or was it medical imaging such as x-rays, ultrasounds or CAT scans?  According to Olshansky, it was the discovery and dissemination of basic public health such as sanitation, hand-washing, and refrigeration that helped us understand how to ward off communicable diseases.

To read more, click here.

UIC SPH ALUMNI EDUCATE YOUTH ABOUT RISKY BEHAVIOR

E DugganOn May 31st, UIC SPH alumni, Anna Blankenberger (MPH, ’11) and Madiha Qureshi (MPH, ’09), and current SPH graduate student Erin Duggan, stepped into a 9th grade health sciences classroom at the UIC College Prep High School (UICCP).   They sat among 28 high school students, waiting for the students to begin their presentations.  “We’re really excited to see how the students present their cases to their peers,” said Blankenberger, Program Coordinator of Health Education at the March of Dimes. The presentations were the final project of a 2-week course designed to teach teens about how their health behaviors today can impact their futures.  By participating in risky behavior, such as drinking alcohol, smoking cigarettes or being sexually active at a young age, high school students increase their risk for poor health outcomes in the future. 

To read more, click here.

Picture of the UIC SPH graduation hat.

UIC SPH CELEBRATES ITS 39TH ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT

"Go out and shake up the world!"  This was the message delivered by Alex Kotlowitz, bestselling author of There Are No Children Here and producer of “The Interrupters,” at the 39th UIC SPH commencement.  Kotlowitz praised the graduates for embarking on the noble path of public health and challenged them to “make the rest of society see what you see. "  Kotlowitz is a storyteller and believes that "stories are how we make sense of the world.  Stories guide us," Kotlowitz believes, by helping to inform policies and create laws, ensure that we not forget the past, and inform us about the future. 

To learn more, click here.

2012 SPH STUDENT RESEARCH DAY

Research Day 2012On April 3, 2012, the UIC School of Public Health held its 7th Annual Student Research/Practice Awards Day .  This event is held each year during National Public Health Week and honors students whose research addresses a variety of critical public health issues.  Thirty students displayed their research, which ranged in topic from infant mortality to chemical dependency in pharmacists to sexual behavior of college freshman.  All thirty graduate students were on site to present their work to a panel of judges, fellow classmates, faculty, alumni and other members of the SPH community.  

To learn more, click here.

HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR CONSIDERS PUBLIC HEALTH CAREER

Asha BinbekAsha Binbek is one of two thousand Chicago Public School (CPS) students enrolled in the Urban Health Diversity Programs Pathway to Health Professions Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP) at the UIC School of Public Health.  During the time that Asha has been a participant in the program, her experiences have heightened her career interest in both medicine and public health.  She was one of three high school students to present at the 4th Annual Minority Health in the Midwest Conference in February, where she presented among Master’s and Doctoral students on the health disparities of breast cancer. “I had the privilege to work with Funmi Apantaku-Onayemi and Robin Mitchell on the UIC Beating Breast Cancer Project.   They inspired me to do my poster on breast cancer. I feel like there is a lot that needs to be said about Breast Cancer and the only people that can help are the people that know about it.  I wanted to educate more people on the topic.”

To read more, click here.

THE INTERRUPTERS

The Interrupters Poster that has an image of Chicago in the background."The Interrupters," a documentary film about Cure Violence (formerly CeaseFire), the anti-violence program based at the UIC School of Public Health, has been seen all across the country and world. It made its world premiere at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival. Months later, the film is a New York Times Critic’s Pick. "Oscar material," says film critic Roger Ebert. "Mighty and heart-wrenching," writes the Chicago Tribune’s Michael Phillips. These are just a few of the many praises received by the film that has sold out shows in Chicago and the UK. The film was broadcast as part of the PBS "Frontline" series in February 2012. "The Interrupters," sheds light on the violence in they city of Chicago, and the men and women fighting every day to stop the violence. It follows two men and a woman who, to this day, continue to work as violence interrupters for Cure Violence. Standing in the gap between those who would want to do harm to each other. Protecting their Chicago communities from the violence they once engaged in themselves.

"The Interrupters," sheds light on the violence in they city of Chicago, and the men and women fighting every day to stop the violence. It follows two men and a woman who, to this day,  continue to work as violence interrupters for Cure Violence. Standing in the gap between those who would want to do harm to each other.  Protecting their Chicago communities from the violence they once engaged in themselves.

To learn more about the film and the Cure Violence program, click here.

 

 

ALUMNUS RECEIVES UIF AWARD

On Friday, April 4, 2014, The University ofProfile image of Steve Thompson. Illinois at Chicago (UIC)‌ and the University of Illinois Foundation (UIF) co-hosted their annual reception and dinner to honor alumni and friends whose support and advocacy has had a meaningful impact on the campus.  The event, called An Evening With Legacies and Leaders, was truly a unique gathering recognized many of the significant contributions to the UIC.

To read more, click here.

UIC SPH CELEBRATES ITS 9TH ANNUAL STUDENT RESEARCH DAY

On April 8, 2014, the UIC School of Public Health Banner of Annual Student Research Dayheld its 9th Annual Student Research and Practice Awards Day.  This event is held each year during National Public Health Week and honors students whose research addresses a variety of critical public health issues. 

 To learn more, click here.

 

POWELL NAMED DISTINGUISHED RESEARCHER OF THE YEAR

Lisa M. Powell, Ph.D., ProfessorProfile image of Lisa M. Powell in the division of Health Policy and Administration, has been named the 2013 Distinguished Researcher of the Year in the field of Social Sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  The Vice Chancellor for Research made the announcement on January 16, 2014.  This honor recognizes the efforts and commitment of researchers who have demonstrated outstanding research achievements to advance the knowledge in their field of expertise.  Dr. Powell is one of five researchers at UIC to receive this honor and all were recognized at a reception on February 27, 2014.

To learn more, click here.

TV ADS NUTRITIONALLY UNHEALTHY FOR KIDSProfile pic of Powell Lisa.

The nutritional value of food and drinks advertised on children’s television programs is worse than food shown in ads during general air time, according to University of Illinois at Chicago researchers.

The study is published in the December issue of the journal Childhood Obesity.

To learn more, click here.

GRANT TO RECRUIT TRANSFER STUDENTS IN SCIENCES

What's New at uic SPH, SPH Newsroom Backed by a $1.4 million federal grant, the University of Illinois at Chicago will launch a new program to increase the number of underrepresented students who pursue degrees and research careers in the behavioral and biomedical sciences.  The five-year grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, one of the National Institutes of Health, partners UIC with the City Colleges of Chicago in an effort to bolster recruitment, training, mentorship, and degree completion in health-related fields for students from underrepresented backgrounds.

To learn more, click here.

UIC ALUMNUS IS A TRUE NETWORK PROVIDER

After his first year of medical school at UIC, Dr. Lee Image profile of Lee FrancisFrancis, MD, (MPH ’00) signed up for a summer program in community health in which he had the option of working near San Diego or in rural Alabama. With visions of sand and surf in his head, Francis opted to head for the Coast. “I thought, ‘The beach, the ocean—that can’t be bad,’” he says.

To learn more, click here.

 

UIC ALUMNA NAMED DIRECTOR OF UIC’S URBAN HEALTH PROGRAMProfile pic of Jamila R. Rashid.

University of Illinois School of Public Health alumna, Jamila R. Rashid, PhD, (MPH ’90), has been named the new Executive Director of the Urban Health Program (UHP).  Dr. Rashid currently holds the position of Associate Director for Research and Policy, and serves as Senior Advisor to the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office Of Minority Health.  “Dr. Rashid's passion and experience for advancing minorities in the health professions, coupled with her collaborative leadership style will bring deep rooted commitment and a wealth of experience to this position,” says UIC Chancellor Paula Allen-Meares.

To learn more, click here.

UIC ALUMNUS HONORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY

Lewis N. Lampiris profile image.

The American Association of Public Health Dentistry (AAPHD) selected Lewis N. Lampiris, DDS, (MPH ’97), to receive its highest and most prestigious honor, the Distinguished Service Award. The award, which recognizes excellent and significant contributions to dental public health, was presented during the 2013 National Oral Health Conference held in April in Huntsville, Alabama.

To read more, click here.

Like us on Facebook!