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Advocacy

Cuomo’s task force to combat worker exploitation

This article has concrete plans that NY state plans to take to address problems faced by exploited workers. Has excellent action steps at the end.

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Minimum Wage Increase Study

Filing of a presentation on the results of a study evaluating a minimum wage increase in Minneapolis and Hennepin/Ramsey County.

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Organizing for #HealthyHours Stable Work Hours Protect Our Health and Well-Being

This fact sheet provides a brief summary of the harms unpredictable scheduling practices in the service sector have on working people’s health.

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Raise Wages, Kill Jobs?

This report examines historical data relating to the 22 increases in the federal minimum wage between 1938 and 2009 to determine whether or not raising wages leads to lower employment rates. Findings show no correlation between federal minimum-wage increases and lower employment levels, and actually show that most of the time employment rates increased following a minimum wage hike.

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Still falling short on hours and pay: Part-time work becoming new normal

This report identifies and explains the monthly and annual trends in involuntary part-time work, the role of key industries driving much of those trends, the kinds of workers and industries most affected by part-time work, and the challenges that workers in part-time jobs face.

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Wage Theft is Costing Workers $50 Billion a Year in Stolen Pay

Wage theft is epidemic in the United States: approximately $50 billion in wages are stolen every year from workers nationwide, and there are few ways to recover those lost wages. This article outlines the consequences of wage theft and ways that workers can fight back.

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Data

Bureau of Labor Statistics Projections Overview and Highlights, 2016-26

This report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics outlines how America's changing demographics will have far-reaching effects on the labor force, the economy, and employment over the 2016–26 decade. The overall labor force participation rate is projected to decline as older workers leave the labor force, constraining economic growth. The aging baby- boomer segment of the population will drive demand for healthcare services and related occupations.

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Clocking In

Clocking In is an innovative, interactive, multimedia tool that shows racial and gender inequities in the restaurant, retail, and domestic industries. It brings data, stories, and resources to support the collective action for fair treatment at work.

View the Tool

Contingent Workforce: Size, Characteristics, Earnings, and Benefits

This report examines what is known about (1) the size of the contingent workforce, (2) the characteristics and employment experiences of contingent versus standard workers, and (3) any differences in earnings, benefits, and measures of poverty between contingent and standard workers.

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The Growing Use of Mandatory Arbitration

The Economic Policy Institute conducted a nationally representative survey of nonunion private-sector employers regarding their use of mandatory employment arbitration. This study finds that since the early 2000s, the share of workers subject to mandatory arbitration has more than doubled and now exceeds 55 percent. Review additional findings by clicking the link.

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Health and Income: The Impact of Changes to Boston's Living Wage Ordinance on the Health of Living Wage Workers

This report examines the health consequences of low wages as well as the health impact of increasing the minimum wage in Boston, and provides numerous policy recommendations for maximizing the health benefits of Boston's Living Wage Ordinance (LWO).

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Health Care Use And Spending Patterns Vary By Wage Level In Employer-Sponsored Plans

Employees face an increasing financial burden for health services as health care costs. This resource examines health care use in relation to employee wages. For policy makers, these findings can inform employer benefit design strategies and research priorities, to encourage effective use of health care services.

PMID: 28167713

Minimum Wage Increase Study

Filing of a presentation on the results of a study evaluating a minimum wage increase in Minneapolis and Hennepin/Ramsey County.

Read the Report

Organizing for #HealthyHours Stable Work Hours Protect Our Health and Well-Being

This fact sheet provides a brief summary of the harms unpredictable scheduling practices in the service sector have on working people’s health.

View the Fact Sheet

Paid Sick Leave May Help Employers Reduce Costs

Paid sick leave might help reduce absenteeism related to the spread of flu and other infectious diseases, which might translate into money saved for employers. Using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and other published literature, NIOSH Researchers estimated potential savings for employers.

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Racial Disparities in access to Job Quality

Discusses disparities between races in access to wages, sick days, paid parental leave, inadequate hours/unpredictable work schedules.

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Scheduling on the Cutting Edge: Implementation of San Francisco's First-in-the-Nation Fair Scheduling Law

This report examines data from San Francisco retail workers regarding their experiences with scheduling after the passage of the Retail Workers Bill of Rights (RWBOR), which established first-in-the-nation protections for retail workers, guaranteeing advance notice of their schedules, compensation for last-minute changes, and greater access to additional hours.

View the Report

Stable Jobs = Healthier Lives

An infographic from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation detailing the consequences of unemployment and unhealthy work conditions.

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Innovative Initiatives

A New Brooklyn Clinic for Hotel Workers Who Enjoy No-Cost Care

This article discusses the innovative approach that the New York Hotel and Motel Trades Council has championed as a way of addressing the national challenge of paying for health care. The union established a contract that incorporates annual raises and diverted funds to be used in the establishment of an 11-story health clinic.

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Fair Chance Licensing Reform: Opening Pathways for People with Records to Join Licensed Professions

This toolkit is intended to provide lawmakers and advocates in states across the country with the resources necessary to set about the work of fair chance licensing reform to open pathways for people with records to join licensed professions.

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Going on Offense during Challenging Times: Bargaining for the Common Good (BCG) campaigns

Bargaining for the Common Good (BCG) campaigns are expanding and spreading across the country. These campaigns offer important lessons on how unions, racial justice organizations, and other community groups can go on offense and win in these challenging times. In essence, BCG campaigns are when union and community groups together leverage contract negotiations for broader, shared gains.

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If jobs stop bullets, why aren't more companies stepping up?

Recognizing the correlation between joblessness and violence is an important step in addressing the epidemic of violence in Chicago. This article focuses on several employers who are intentionally hiring workers from zip codes with high levels of violence and joblessness, and providing them with quality jobs that promote health, stability, and growth for these communities.

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Principles of High Road Employers: A Path to Building a Sustainable Economy

High Road Employers see their employees, the communities within which they operate, and the products and services they provide as equally critical ingredients to their financial success. High Road Employers know that their businesses have a far better chance to thrive when they operate responsibly and their employees are compensated fairly for meaningful work. This document lists various principles, policy initiatives, and market-based initiatives that help build the sustainable economy of the future.

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The Role of Labor Unions in Creating Conditions that Promote Public Health

Labor union contracts create higher wage and benefit standards, working hours limits, workplace hazards protections, and other factors. Public health practitioners and labor unions would benefit by partnering to create sophisticated contracts to address social determinants of health.

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Partners

If jobs stop bullets, why aren't more companies stepping up?

Recognizing the correlation between joblessness and violence is an important step in addressing the epidemic of violence in Chicago. This article focuses on several employers who are intentionally hiring workers from zip codes with high levels of violence and joblessness, and providing them with quality jobs that promote health, stability, and growth for these communities.

Read the Article

Principles of High Road Employers: A Path to Building a Sustainable Economy

High Road Employers see their employees, the communities within which they operate, and the products and services they provide as equally critical ingredients to their financial success. High Road Employers know that their businesses have a far better chance to thrive when they operate responsibly and their employees are compensated fairly for meaningful work. This document lists various principles, policy initiatives, and market-based initiatives that help build the sustainable economy of the future.

View the Document

The Role of Labor Unions in Creating Conditions that Promote Public Health

Labor union contracts create higher wage and benefit standards, working hours limits, workplace hazards protections, and other factors. Public health practitioners and labor unions would benefit by partnering to create sophisticated contracts to address social determinants of health.

View the Report

Policy Initiatives

Adding Inequality to injury: The costs of failing to protect workers on the job

Every year, more than three million workers are seriously injured, and thousands more are killed on the job. It is vitally important that state-based workers’ compensation programs take steps to eliminate roadblocks that prevent workers with compensable injuries or illnesses from receiving the full compensation to which they are entitled.

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The Agenda to Raise America's Pay

The Economic Policy Institute (EPI) acknowledges that wage stagnation is the country’s key economic challenge. Despite a rise in economic productivity, for the vast majority of workers, including college-educated workers, wages have stagnated or declined since 1979. In their “Agenda to Raise America’s Pay’” EPI outlines the policies necessary to generate wage growth.

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Ban the Box: What This New Law Means for Potential Employees With a Criminal Record

A law in California took effect preventing companies from requiring job applicants to disclose criminal histories. It's known as ban-the-box legislation. The box refers to the section in job applications that potential employees check if they have a criminal record. NPR's Lakshmi Singh talks with National Employment Law Project attorney Beth Avery, who helped draft the California legislation.

Listen to the Interview

California Governor Brown Signs Fair Chance Act, Extending 'Ban the Box' to Private Employers

California becomes the 10th state to require both public- and private-sector employers to delay background checks and inquiries about job applicants’ conviction records until they have made a conditional job offer to the applicant. The law takes effect in 2018.

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Cuomo’s task force to combat worker exploitation

This article has concrete plans that NY state plans to take to address problems faced by exploited workers. Has excellent action steps at the end.

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Cutting Corporate Taxes Will Not Boost American Wages

This report from the Economic Policy Institute outlines how the claim that corporate tax cuts will trickle down to help American workers by boosting economy-wide productivity and hence wages is clearly wrong. Economic logic and evidence show that American workers should not expect any wage boost from reducing the statutory corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 20 percent.

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Health and Income: The Impact of Changes to Boston's Living Wage Ordinance on the Health of Living Wage Workers

This report outlines the findings from the Health Impact Assessment that examined the effect of Boston's Living Wage Ordinance on the health of those currently covered, and asks what changes could be made to maximize improvements in health.

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HB 690: Protections for Day and Temporary Workers

Governor Rauner recently signed HB 690 into law, which offers important protections for day/temporary workers including: not charging workers for transportation, providing documentation that clearly states the location and wages of the worksite, not using day/temporary workers to break up strikes, providing official itemized statements of wages, increasing oversight of temp agencies, and more.

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Improving Health by Increasing the Minimum Wage

A policy statement created by APHA linking increasing the minimum wage to improved health outcomes. In addition to delving deeply into this relationship, they propose a number of action steps that can be taken at all three levels of governance. 

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The Minimum Wage and Health: A Bay Area Analysis

This analysis demonstrates the effect that a minimum wage increase would have on the health and well-being of nearly 1 million low-wage workers. It shows that policies that reduce poverty by raising the wages of low income people can significantly improve overall health and reduce health inequities.

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New Economy, New Social Contract

Within the decade, nearly half of American workers are expected to find themselves working as freelancers, temps, and contractors. This report outlines a fair, sensible and affordable way to create a new safety net for these types of workers.

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Presentation to NYC Office of Labor Policy and Standards

Dr. Janice Fine's presentation to the NYC Office of Labor Policy and Standards outlines the issues with complaint- based enforcement, and proposes some alternative strategies to enforcement. This presentation also focuses on paid sick leave and other related ordinances.

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Racial Disparities in access to Job Quality

Discusses disparities between races in access to wages, sick days, paid parental leave, inadequate hours/unpredictable work schedules.

View the Infographic

Seattle's Minimum Wage Experience, 2015-2016

This report analyzes county and city-level data on employment from 2009-2016 for Seattle workers following the minimum wage increase to $13/hour. It found that wages overall increased across the food service sector, and that employment rates were not affected, even in limited-service restaurants.

Read the Report

Still falling short on hours and pay: Part-time work becoming new normal

This report identifies and explains the monthly and annual trends in involuntary part-time work, the role of key industries driving much of those trends, the kinds of workers and industries most affected by part-time work, and the challenges that workers in part-time jobs face.

Read the Report

Publications

Are immigrants, ethnic and linguistic minorities over-represented in jobs with a high level of compensated risk?

This article outlines the ways in which immigrants, visible, and linguistic minorities, in Montréal are more likely to work where there is an increased level of compensated risk. Data was collected using census and worker’s compensation data. DOI: 10.1002/ajim.20845

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Contingent Workforce: Size, Characteristics, Earnings, and Benefits

This report examines what is known about (1) the size of the contingent workforce, (2) the characteristics and employment experiences of contingent versus standard workers, and (3) any differences in earnings, benefits, and measures of poverty between contingent and standard workers.

View the Report

Could Raising the Minimum Wage Improve the Public’s Health?

Despite the colossal number of minimum wage studies by economists, a meager number consider health. This publication outlines the ways in which raising the minimum wage may contribute to improved health outcomes.

PMID: PMC4940672

Differences in access to wage replacement benefits for absences due to work-related injury or illness in Canada

This article examines the factors associated with differences in access to income replacement benefits, like worker’s compensation, for workers experiencing a work-related injury or illness of 1-week or longer in the Canadian labor force. DOI: 10.1002/ajim.20683

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The Effect of an Increased Minimum Wage on Infant Mortality and Birth Weight

This study investigates the effects of state minimum wage laws on low birth weight and infant mortality in the United States.

PMID: PMC4940666

Estimating Potential Reductions in Premature Mortality in New York City From Raising the Minimum Wage to $15

Researchers assessed the potential reductions in premature mortality that could have been achieved in 2008 to 2012 if the minimum wage had been $15 per hour in New York City.

PMID: PMC4880275

Factors Underlying Observed Injury Rate Differences Between Temporary Workers and Permanent Peers

This study explores why temporary workers face increased risk of injury as compared to permanent workers in similar occupations. In addition to assessing risk factors that contribute to this reality, the authors also offer several policy recommendations for addressing this disparity.

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The Gig Economy and Contingent Work: An Occupational Health Assessment

This publication addresses the need to develop, evaluate, and implement interventions that address the needs of workers in non-traditional employment relationships.

PMID: 28244887

Health and Income: The Impact of Changes to Boston's Living Wage Ordinance on the Health of Living Wage Workers

This report outlines the findings from the Health Impact Assessment that examined the effect of Boston's Living Wage Ordinance on the health of those currently covered, and asks what changes could be made to maximize improvements in health.

Read the Report

Health Care Use And Spending Patterns Vary By Wage Level In Employer-Sponsored Plans

Employees face an increasing financial burden for health services as health care costs. This resource examines health care use in relation to employee wages. For policy makers, these findings can inform employer benefit design strategies and research priorities, to encourage effective use of health care services.

PMID: 28167713

IMF Fiscal Monitor: Tackling Inequality

This report from the International Monetary Fund discusses how excessive inequality can erode social cohesion, lead to political polarization, and ultimately lower economic growth, and proposes three salient policy debates: tax rates at the top of the income distribution, the introduction of a universal basic income, and the role of public spending on education and health. For an additional analysis, visit the IMF blog.

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“It’s Totally Destroyed Our Life” Exploring the Pathways and Mechanisms Between Precarious Employment and Health and Well-being Among Immigrant Men and Women in Toronto

This article describes the cumulative and intersecting micro-level pathways and mechanisms between precarious employment and health among immigrant men and women in Toronto. The article describes how precarious employment negatively impacts workers’ physical and mental health as well as that of their spouses or partners and children. DOI: 10.1177/0020731417730011

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Job Characteristics Associated with Self-Rated Fair or Poor Health Among U.S. Workers

Many aspects of a person’s job may influence health, and this study found that the factors that were associated with poor health outcomes included having no paid sick leave, lack of job stability, difficulty balancing work and family, and experiencing threats/bullying on the job. Public health professionals and employers should consider these factors when developing interventions to improve worker health.

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Jobs for Climate and Justice: A Worker Alternative to the Trump Agenda

Both the working class and the climate are facing immense threats to their health and sustainability. The Jobs for Climate and Justice plan outlines what we can accomplish in our communities, cities, and states to provide jobs and economic security while also protecting the environment and preventing dangerous climate change.

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The Many Futures of Work: Working Papers & Resources

The Many Futures of Work: Possibilities and Perils conference is an exploration of the loss of middle income jobs and the changing nature of how we work. Papers were presented at this conference to guide discussion on taking action and taking control. The aim is to brighten many pathways to the future by providing a venue for enlightened thinking by businesses, unions, governments, foundations, workforce and education institutions, and grassroots and community organizations.

View the Papers and Resources

The Minimum Wage and Health: A Bay Area Analysis

This analysis demonstrates the effect that a minimum wage increase would have on the health and well-being of nearly 1 million low-wage workers. It shows that policies that reduce poverty by raising the wages of low income people can significantly improve overall health and reduce health inequities.

Read the Analysis

Non-standard employment around the world: Understanding challenges, shaping prospects

From the International Labour Organization, this report documents the incidence and trends of non-standard forms of employment across different countries of the world and explores the reasons behind this phenomenon, including increased firm competition, shifting organizational practices of firms, and changes and gaps in the regulation of work.

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Occupational Safety and Health in the Temporary Services Industry: A Model for a Community–University Partnership

This article outlines a project that brought together local workers’ centers and university investigators to build a corps of Occupational Health Promoters (OHPs) and to test a survey tool and recruitment methods to identify hazards and raise awareness among workers employed by temporary staffing companies. OHPs reported two companies to OSHA, resulting in several citations.

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Precarious employment experiences and their health consequences: Towards a theoretical framework

Develop a detailed framework that outlines the key aspects of work experiences that makes them precarious, and to consider links between these aspects and downstream health effects.

PMID: 17429147

Precarious Work Experiences of Racialized Immigrant Woman in Toronto: A Community-Based Study

Despite their high levels of education, racialized immigrant women in Canada are over-represented in low-paid, low-skill jobs characterized by highrisk and precarity. This project documents the experiences of racialized immigrant women in Toronto with precarious employment.

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RaceForward

RaceForward writes and collects reports that highlight the ways institutional and structural racism leads to inequitable social and economic outcomes in our society and discusses ways to nurture and strengthen social change.

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Scheduling on the Cutting Edge: Implementation of San Francisco's First-in-the-Nation Fair Scheduling Law

This report examines data from San Francisco retail workers regarding their experiences with scheduling after the passage of the Retail Workers Bill of Rights (RWBOR), which established first-in-the-nation protections for retail workers, guaranteeing advance notice of their schedules, compensation for last-minute changes, and greater access to additional hours.

View the Report

Seattle's Minimum Wage Experience, 2015-2016

This report analyzes county and city-level data on employment from 2009-2016 for Seattle workers following the minimum wage increase to $13/hour. It found that wages overall increased across the food service sector, and that employment rates were not affected, even in limited-service restaurants.

Read the Report

Stories/Articles

A New Brooklyn Clinic for Hotel Workers Who Enjoy No-Cost Care

This article discusses the innovative approach that the New York Hotel and Motel Trades Council has championed as a way of addressing the national challenge of paying for health care. The union established a contract that incorporates annual raises and diverted funds to be used in the establishment of an 11-story health clinic.

Read the Article

The Barriers Stopping Poor People From Moving to Better Jobs

High housing costs are one important factor that deter people from moving to areas that have better paying jobs. High-income cities are still appealing to many workers, but only highly skilled workers who can command salaries high enough to make it worthwhile to move. Low-income workers will end up spending much of their incomes on housing if they move, and so stay put in lower paying positions. When most economic growth is concentrated in urban centers, it makes it impossible for low-wage workers to participate.

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Ben & Jerry's Strikes Deal to Improve Migrant Dairy Workers' Conditions

An interesting perspective on a high-road employer which has self-imposed fees and regulations to protect the living and working conditions of the dairy farmers that provide the milk for Ben and Jerry's Ice Cream. In addition to ensuring that their workers are paid fairly, the "Milk with Dignity" contract ensures that workers receive safe and dignified housing and working conditions.

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Chasing the Dream

Chasing The Dream is a series of stories and films from NEXT Avenue, PBS, and a number of public TV and radio stations. From finding and starting a new job to financial planning and handling racial and gender inequities in the workplace, Americans face a unique set of challenges when it comes to financial security, jobs, and opportunity. Click the link to view the many stories produced on jobs, poverty, and economic opportunity.

View the Stories

Clocking In

Clocking In is an innovative, interactive, multimedia tool that shows racial and gender inequities in the restaurant, retail, and domestic industries. It brings data, stories, and resources to support the collective action for fair treatment at work.

View the Tool

Diseases of Distress

This blog post examines the increase of mortality among white, non-Hispanic, middle-aged Americans in recent years. Economists Anne Case and Angus decided to probe whether it was possible to estimate the contribution of work and working conditions to this increase in mortality.

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Education Isn't the Key to a Good Income

Contrary to the popular belief that getting a good education is the biggest determinant of future economic success, research has shown that factors like higher minimum wages, the presence and strength of labor unions, and clear career pathways within local industries are likely to play more important roles in facilitating a poor child’s ability to rise up the economic ladder when they reach adulthood.

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Future of Work Series

Popular ideas about the work are woefully out of date. The New York Times Future of Work series examines work in the context of America’s working class and organizing efforts, technology’s impact, universal guaranteed incomes, the necessity of new skills and the effectiveness of retraining programs.

View the Article: The New Working Class
View the Article: Automation Nation
View the Article: Realizing a Universal Income
View the Article: Meet the Workers
View the Article: Does Retraining Work?

The Gig Economy Celebrates Working Yourself to Death

The article discusses some of the social and cultural norms that have normalized the dangerous demands and effects of precarious labor.

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Giving Voices to Temporary Workers: The Fight for Equality

This short video shares some of the challenges that temporary workers face in Chicago. Temporary workers answer questions such as "Were you properly trained for the position you were hired for?" "Did you feel comfortable speaking out if there was an issue?" and "What would you like legislators to know?"

View the Video

If jobs stop bullets, why aren't more companies stepping up?

Recognizing the correlation between joblessness and violence is an important step in addressing the epidemic of violence in Chicago. This article focuses on several employers who are intentionally hiring workers from zip codes with high levels of violence and joblessness, and providing them with quality jobs that promote health, stability, and growth for these communities.

Read the Article

Inside the Real Gig Economy

This mini-documentary highlights the immense problems that temporary workers experience as they look for work, including hiring discrimination, job instability, lack of safety training, and lack of benefits, as well as the greater social and economic consequences it causes in communities.

View the Documentary

Mexican mother feeds the homeless of Little Village and Pilsen

Check out this feature article on one of our inspiring research assistants, Dolores Castañeda, who feeds and protects the homeless of Little Village and Pilsen.

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NIOSH Research Rounds

NIOSH Research Rounds is a monthly bulletin of selected research conducted by researchers at NIOSH and NIOSH-funded researchers at other institutions.

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Precarious work is now the new norm, United Way report says.

Discusses consequences of precarious work for workers mental, physical, and emotional health, and the impact that it has on the ability to develop a competitive workforce.

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The Precariat: the New Dangerous Class

Unstable labor is becoming the norm, and it has major consequences for social cohesion and political instability.

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Two billion dollars in stolen wages were recovered for workers in 2015 and 2016—and that’s just a drop in the bucket

In 2015 and 2016, a total of $2 billion in stolen wages were recovered for workers. This represents wages stolen by employers who, for example, refuse to pay promised wages, pay employees for only some of the hours worked, or fail to pay overtime premiums when employees work more than 40 hours in a week. This report defines and details wage theft in the United States as well as solutions.

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What Amazon Does to Poor Cities

In the past 10 years, Amazon has dramatically expanded its footprint across the country. However, the debate over Amazon’s HQ2 obscures the company’s rapid expansion in low-income areas. Some communities desperate to attract economic activity have been left worse off since Amazon has opened warehouses in their areas, forcing community members to take precarious jobs.

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Why Aren't Wages Rising Faster...

These articles provide an analysis as to why wages have remained stagnant despite relatively low unemployment. This phenomenon is a major contributor to the widening wage gap and income inequality.

Read the NY Times Article: Why Aren't Wages Rising Faster Now That Unemployment Is Lower? Read the Washington Post Article: Why Aren't Wages Growing More Quickly? A Graphical Analysis.

Why succeeding against the odds can make you sick

Exploration of why those who were “more diligent and tended to strive for success” were more likely than the others to get sick. Looks at factors such as race and adversity.

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Why Work Became So Bad for So Many

Splitting off functions that were once managed internally has been a successful business strategy, as large companies maintain the quality of their brand without the cost of an expensive workforce. But this approach has led to stagnation in wages and benefits and a lower standard of living for workers.

Link to Video

Training

A New Look at the Way We Work: Nonstandard Work Arrangements and Their Impacts on Worker Safety and Health

This webinar, a part of the NIOSH Total Worker Health Webinar Series, focused on explaining what is considered a 'nonstandard work arrangement,' health impacts of such work, and potential interventions and solutions consistent with a Total Worker Health approach. Featured speakers: Rene Pana-Cryan, PhD, Sherry Baron, MD, MPH, and Lisa Brosseau, ScD, CIH. 1.5 CEU are available for viewing this webinar.

View this archived webinar as well as others from the series

The Challenges of Precarious Labor

Presentations from the Albert Shanker Institute's Challenges of Precarious Labor conference.

View the Presentations

The Gig Economy

This webinar identifies the most promising and troubling elements of independent work; generates ideas on what could make independent work more stable and sustainable for workers, especially vulnerable and/or lower skilled workers; highlights promising innovations that are already underway; and shares strategies for supporting independent workers.

View the webinar

Hospitals Aligned for Healthy Communities

These toolkits are designed to help health and hospital systems improve community health and social conditions through inclusive hiring, investment, and purchasing.

Access the toolkits

Making Gig Jobs Good Jobs

As technological advances leave many workers without decent incomes, safety nets, or basic rights, the National Employment Law Project and SiX Action teamed up to offer new models for turning these "gig" jobs into good jobs.

View the webinar

Moving Public Health Practice Upstream: A Case Study on the Minimum Wage

An on-line learning module developed by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center about moving public health practice upstream, using campaigns to increase the minimum wage as an example.

View the Training Module

Precarious Employment - the New Norm? & Changing Unhealthy Work to Healthy Work

Presented by Chia-Chia Chang, MPH, MBA, Coordinator for Partnership and New Opportunity Development, Office of Total Worker Health, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) & Lisa Brosseau, ScD, Professor, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago

View the Presentation View the Q&A

Research Symposium: Underserved Workers - Who Are They & What Are Their Workplace H&S Needs?

presented by Lisa Brosseau, ScD, Professor, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago & Joseph Zanoni, PhD, Director of Continuing Education and Outreach, University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health

View the Seminars

Seminars on Demand

University of Michigan Occupational Health and Safety Engineering Seminars on Demand

View the Seminars
 

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